Saturday, April 12, 2008

Process of a Painting

What a glorious spring day it was today! My daffodils bloomed in celebration of the occasion. The sun was warm and the breeze sweet - shorts and a tshirt FINALLY!

Today I worked on a canvas I began when I was still at the Indian Orchard Mills studio. The picture below shows my starting point today.





I then went into it with black paint, accentuating certain lines of the original composition and adding more shapes and forms.




Then I came in with some bold warm tones - bright orange, pink, red and yellow.



I enjoyed some of the drippy effects of the underpainting, and at this point, things were getting too "locked in" so I brought back some drips and splatters in a light color.




Then came some white....



More white, more drips...



Now the canvas was looking pretty close to finished...



The final stage was adding a bit more black to make some parts of the lines stand out. And here is the finished product.



Why Not - Acrylic on 30" x 40" canvas

6 comments:

Ivan Chan Studio said...

Wow, that's wonderful getting to see the evolution/process of your painting!

Take care,

I.

GJC said...

The muse has taken you into her arms these days!
What a treat to see the whole process:)
Gabrielle

CHEWY said...

IOM Studios! OMG! I'm in Springfield.

hargo wijoyo said...

i'm from indonesia, love to see ur painting.

fun and dinamic. r u happy when u were paint??

did u ever paint with brokenhard feeling?? i just wonder how it will be the result.

nice.

Jessica Torrant said...

thank you ivan and gabrielle!

chewy - yay! i had a studio at the iom for two years, now i work from home, but i LOVE that area. (i'm about 40 minutes away, which is close in many respects, but proved to be too far to take optimal advantage of my rented space). If you have any local shows, let me know!

Jessica Torrant said...

hargo to answer your questions, i have painted from all different states of emotion, but i do have to say that i used pain as inspiration a lot through my 20s and rarely now. i had to go through that era because 1. it helped me work through some issues 2. it broke down a lot of walls within me that needed to come down 3. once i got it out, i was able to make peace with it - each brick in the wall. that isn't to say life is devoid of pain for me now, it's just different, and that is reflected in my paintings. i hope this answered your questions!